Thoughts from the Wet Coast

The musings of an ASP.NET Developer from Canada's We(s)t Coast

Comments

Articles

 
     

DNN Development Tips:10 - Using Action Filters in your Services Framework methods

Oct 23 2014

In an earlier blog I described the use of the DnnExceptionFilterAttribute which can be used to simplify the exception handling in Services Framework action methods.  In this blog I turn my attention to another, more generic attribute that you can apply to your action methods.

DNN Development Tips:9 - Using Moq, the “It” class

Oct 22 2014

In a previous article in this series of blog posts, I introduced Moq (Mock-you) – the mocking framework we are using in DNN to generate Mock objects for testing.

DNN Development Tips:7 - Using Moq

Oct 20 2014

In a previous article in this series of blog posts, I described the different Test Doubles that can be used when unit testing your application.

DNN Development Tips:6 - Dummies, Fakes, Stubs and Mocks

Oct 18 2014

One of the tenets of Unit Testing is that in order to test a piece of code we often need to create some alternate implementation of one or more of the Interfaces involved in a test.  This concept is generally called a Test Double.  However there are many types of Test Double, and there is some degree of confusion about the types of doubles used.

DNN Development Tips:5 - What Tests should I Write

Oct 17 2014

One of the biggest challenges in writing Unit Tests - at least when you write them after you have created the actual code, rather than in a Test Driven Development style, is determining what should be tested.

DNN Development Tips:2 - Requires and Guard

Jul 16 2014

As part of this series on DNN Development Tips, I hope to “uncover” little know classes/methods - in the DNN Framework (and any of the 3rd party libraries that we use, such as Telerik or the .NET framework itself).

Project Naif - 1: An Introduction

Jul 14 2014

I have been working for a while on a library of simple components, which I have called Project “Naif”.  Naif is the masculine form of the more common adjective “naïve”.   Both words are originally French and while naïve is in fairly common usage in English, naif is much less used.  But they mean the same thing – marked by unaffected simplicity - as defined by Merriam Webster

Categories

Tags